• Economia di Comunione
    Persone e imprese che attivano processi di comunione.
    Idee e pratiche per un agire economico improntato alla reciprocità e all’accoglienza.
    Un ambito di dialogo e di azione per chiunque voglia impegnarsi per una civiltà più fraterna guardando il mondo a partire dagli esclusi e dalle vittime
    scopri di più...
  • Rapporto Edc 2018
    Finalmente disponibile il Rapporto Edc 2018. Guarda il video e scopri di più con la scheda di approfondimento.scopri di più...
  • #EoF: Side Event, Perugia 2020
    Promosso da Economia di Comunione, il side-event di Perugià del 27-29 marzo 2020 è per tutti coloro che non possono partecipare direttamente all’Economy of Francescoscopri di più...
  • The Economy of Francesco
    scopri di più...

Economia di Comunione

Persone e imprese che attivano processi di comunione.

Idee e pratiche per un agire economico improntato alla reciprocità e all’accoglienza.

Un ambito di dialogo e di azione per chiunque voglia impegnarsi per una civiltà più fraterna guardando il mondo a partire dagli esclusi e dalle vittime.

Call for papers: Prizes and Virtues

HEIRS and LUMSA University organize:

Prizes and Virtues

an interdisciplinary workshop

Logo Moneta FelicitasLUMSA University, Rome – April 10-11, 2017

To an economist, a prize, such as a golden medal, is merely a special type of incentive. Any other kind of social scientist would be perplexed by thinking of the Nobel Prize, or of the Medal of Honour, in these terms.

In contemporary neoclassical economics, the concept of incentive is a primitive, similar to that of “utility”, “price”, “production” or “consumption”, that all economists use but none feels the need to define: it is a foundation, or a corner stone, of the science of economics. However, if we tried to articulate what economists mean by incentives, we would probably find that they are considered as any “motivation” for adhering to and for complying with some form of contract.

Once incentives are intended in this all-embracing way, it immediately follows that prizes and awards are considered simply as their sub-set. Yet many real world prizes and awards do not follow this contractarian, consequentialist logic and cannot be understood within this framework. A more complex understanding of human motivation–we believe-is needed to hold that prizes are indeed not incentives.

This search cannot ignore the history of economic and philosophical ideals. Competing theories of action and motivation were central topics of debate among eighteenth century philosophers. David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Adam Smith’s theories implied much more complex social and economic motivations than mere self-interest, which can be opportunely diverted through an appropriate incentive. Within the Italian school of civil economy, Pietro Verri and Antonio Genovesi elaborated on the unintended consequences of public and institutional actions on individuals’ behaviour. InLogo HEIRS 640x128 the same line, Giacinto Dragonetti debated (at a distance) with Cesare Beccaria on the nature and effectiveness of punishments and awards in shaping agents’ choices, both in private and public contexts. From the mid XIX century onward, economists became those social scientists most characterized by the purest anthropology (i.e. that of a human being acting in order to maximize individual utility), endorsing utilitarian philosophy and sacrificing previously complex understanding of human actions. In the XX century, microeconomics has continued this process of anthropological reductionism: management theory, as well as agency and contract theory, have distilled the allembracing theory of incentives.

In the last three decades, behavioural and experimental economics are undermining from within this reductionist model of human behaviour. By taking serious account of concepts such as reciprocity, intrinsic motivation, inequality aversion, and fairness, they are making more complex interpretations of human action and motivation central again, albeit still within the utilitarian framework. In addition, there is an important contemporary philosophical stream of inquiry, the socalled virtue ethics, which competes with utilitarianism yet remains almost unknown to the economic profession. We argue that this research may provide further insights into human action, which seem otherwise intractable within the current anthropological framework, and can cast a new light on the nature and working of prizes as fundamentally different from incentives. In particular, prizes may well suit the rewarding of virtues, because incentive are known to be liable to cause motivation crowdingout.

To advance our understanding of the economics of prizes, awards and their link with virtues, we warmly invite economists, historians, philosophers, scholars in organization and management and other social scientists to answer to this call and submit an extended abstract (max 1000 words).

Keynote speakers: Robert Dur - Erasmus University Rotterdam (Economics), Bruno Frey - University of Basel (Behavioural Science), Ruth Grant - Duke University (Philosophy)

“Pier Luigi Porta” Award:

Pierluigi PortaHeirs will honour the memory of the past Heirs’ President Professor Pier Luigi Porta by a special award to the best paper presented at this conference, a stream of research strongly supported by him before dying. Heirs invites all under fourty scholars to apply for this special “Pier Luigi Porta Award”. The award consist in 2500 euro plus travel cost and accomodation for the conference. The prize will be assigned during the social dinner.

Deadline for submissions of extended abstracts (max 1000 words): 
February 15th, 2017 (acceptance date: February 25th, 2017)
to: Questo indirizzo email è protetto dagli spambots. E' necessario abilitare JavaScript per vederlo.

Organization committee: HEIRS & LUMSA University
Luigino Bruni (LUMSA), Vittorio Pelligra (U. Cagliari), Tommaso Reggiani (LUMSA),  Matteo Rizzolli (LUMSA), Alessandra Smerilli (LUMSA).

Contacts: Questo indirizzo email è protetto dagli spambots. E' necessario abilitare JavaScript per vederlo.

See on INOMICS

web: www.heirs.it/2016/04/08/event/

Marzo 2020, Assisi
"The Economy of Francesco"

 i giovani, un patto, il futuro

i giovani,un patto,il futuro

Seguici su:

26-02-2020

 Agorà - A 60 anni dalla morte dell’imprenditore umanista l'eredità della sua profezia sulla «Città...

24-01-2020

Una mappa del pianeta, a partire dalle sue fonti energetiche, per capire le ragioni dei conflitti...

03-01-2020

Approvate “salvo intese” e con il voto di fiducia, le scelte del Conte 2 assicurano il mancato...

24-02-2020

I Commenti de "Il Sole 24 Ore" - Mind the Economy, la serie di articoli di Vittorio Pelligra sul...

21-01-2020

Opinioni - Rapporto Oxfam 2020. La forza di questi sguardi sull'ingiustizia. di Alessandra...

COME FARE PARTE

Image
Opla
AMU
Eoc
aipec

Seguici su:

Corsi di Economia Biblica 2019

scuola biblica box

14-15 settembre 2019
(Libro di Qoélet)
vedi volantino - Per maggiori informazioni - iscriviti qui

Rapporto Edc 2017

Rapporto Edc 2017

L’economia del dare

L’economia del dare

Chiara Lubich

"A differenza dell' economia consumista, basata su una cultura dell'avere, l'economia di comunione è l'economia del dare..."

Le strisce di Formy!

Le strisce di Formy!

Conosci la mascotte del sito Edc?

Chi è online

Abbiamo 1253 visitatori e nessun utente online

© 2008 - 2019 Economia di Comunione (EdC) - Movimento dei Focolari
creative commons Questo/a opera è pubblicato sotto una Licenza Creative Commons . Progetto grafico: Marco Riccardi - info@marcoriccardi.it

Questo sito utilizza cookie tecnici, anche di terze parti, per consentire l’esplorazione sicura ed efficiente del sito. Chiudendo questo banner, o continuando la navigazione, accetti le nostre modalità per l’uso dei cookie. Nella pagina dell’informativa estesa sono indicate le modalità per negare l’installazione di qualunque cookie.